The 10 Freeze-Dried Candy Facts You Hadn't Thought Of – Candy Jan Co

10 Freeze-Dried Candy Facts You Hadn't Thought Of

Here are a few facts about freeze-dried candy that you probably haven’t heard, and if you have, you may not have realized how significant they are. 

Freeze-drying food is a process that has been around for many decades now. It became quite popular in the 1950s and has long been the go-to method for preserving food for emergency and long-term storage. Freeze-dried food has intensified flavor, lasts forever, and rehydrates quickly. But it was only recently that most of the world became aware of the wonders of freeze-dried candy

We’ve spent more time than most thinking about the freeze-drying process and the uniqueness of the products we create. We feel duty-bound to share some of the things we’ve learned. So here are a few curious observations, fun facts, and words of wisdom we’ve acquired that we think you’d appreciate hearing.

1. Another Word for Freeze-drying is Lyophilization.

The word comes from Lyo- from the Greek meaning to dissolve and Philos- meaning to love. It literally means the process of making something that loves to be dissolved. This word refers to the fact that freeze-dried items typically dissolve readily in water — like when you put a freeze-dried Big Hunk in your mouth, and it melts like cotton candy.

2. Freeze-dried caramels are great for denture wearers.

Anyone who wears dentures knows all too well that there are foods you just can’t eat — sticky things like caramel are a prime example. But what about freeze-dried caramel? It turns out this is tailor-made for people wearing dentures. It’s got the same flavor as the original but with a beautifully crispy texture that won’t get you stuck.

 

If you wear dentures and have been missing some of your favorite chewy candies, snag a bag today — you’ve likely got some lost time to make up.

3. Candy freeze-dried today . . .

would be edible in 2045, the year Ready Player One is set in. We’re not sure if this showcases how great freeze-dried candies are or how messed up it is that it’s totally believable that Ready Player One could be a reality within a quarter-century. Oh well, at least we’ll still have some good candy if that happens.

4. Freeze drying was used in World War II to preserve blood serum.

This one is less appetizing than the others, but it’s important. One of the earlier widespread uses of freeze-drying was to preserve blood serum to treat soldiers. It could be carried without refrigeration for up to two years; this made it ideal for battlefield emergencies. Freeze-dried blood plasma was responsible for saving thousands of lives during WWII and is still used today.

5. Freeze-dried candy corns don’t look much different . . .

from the original, but they become wonderfully crunchy, and their flavor intensifies. This has led us to realize that freeze-drying candy is simply helping it achieve its best form. “Normal” candy is just too watered down.

6. If Marco Polo had freeze-dried some skittles . . .

in Venice and properly stored them in his cellar in 1271 before he left for China, they would have been a nice snack when he returned in 1295. Too bad for the Chinese that he didn’t think to bring them with him, but what are the chances they would have even made it there anyway?

7. Freeze-dried ice cream never made it to space.

It was an icon of space exploration originally developed for the Apollo missions. Still, it was never used on any Apollo mission or any other that we can find a record of. It turns out freeze-dried ice cream was too crumbly for zero-gravity and not the most popular tasting treat among the astronauts.

 

It just goes to show that you can’t (or shouldn’t) freeze-dry everything. Too bad they didn’t have Freeze-dried Skittles or Bit-O-Honey available. NASA, drop us a line before your next launch.

8. Freeze-dried Bit-O-Honey, crumbled up on regular ice cream, is an out-of-this-world treat here on Earth.

There are a lot of technologies that have been developed for military and space exploration that have become indispensable parts of civilian life. This includes things like memory foam, GPS, the internet, and aviator sunglasses. 

 

We’re not sure if freeze-dried ice cream deserves credit for the direct development of freeze-dried candy sprinkled on normal ice cream. It seems like it should at least be mentioned as an inspiration. Whatever role it may have played, it’s earned some respect.


9. “Freeze-drying preserves flavor, color, and appearance while minimizing thermal damage to heat-sensitive nutrients.”

This is how Food Technology Magazine puts it, but we have the experience to back it up. In most cases, the flavor intensifies. The one correction we’d make is that while the color remains the same, the appearance and texture of most candy become something completely new.
This is thanks to the vacuum aspect of freeze-drying. The low pressure creates tiny bubbles in the candy as the moisture is removed. This slowly expands the structure creating a light, fluffy texture akin to baked meringue.

10. If you receive a can of freeze-dried Milk Duds . . . 

for a baby shower today and the can gets lost among canned beets in the pantry, you could serve the Milk Duds at that baby’s college graduation party. 

 

Now imagine if Milk Duds aren’t available in the stores anymore by that time. Freeze-dried candy is not just tasty right now; it’s a time capsule. You might preserve the knowledge of something delicious for a future generation.

Candy Jan has more than just tasty information

The more we learn about the history, the process, and the result of freeze-drying, the more we love it. We’re constantly looking for the next amazing addition to our product line. We love to hear the interesting experiences our customers have as they first try each new candy option. And we love the weird thoughts as much as the relatable ones. 

If you enjoyed these fascinating facts, you’ll love our freeze-dried candy. Check out our website and browse the different freeze-dried candies we have available. Please get in touch with any questions, thoughts, or late-night epiphanies you have while eating our products.